Trajectories of Viral Suppression in People Living With HIV Receiving Coordinated Care: Differences by Comorbidities

Authors

Journal

J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr

Publication Year

2020

Abstract

Background: In March of 2013, the Los Angeles County (LAC) Division of HIV and STD Programs implemented a clinic-based Medical Care Coordination (MCC) Program to increase viral suppression (VS) (<200 c/mL) among people living with HIV (PLWH) at high risk for poor health outcomes.

Objective: This study aimed to estimate trajectories of VS and to assess whether these trajectories differed by stimulant use, housing instability, and depressive symptom severity as reported by PLWH participating in MCC.

Methods: Data represent 6408 PLWH in LAC receiving services from the MCC Program and were obtained from LAC HIV surveillance data matched to behavioral assessments obtained across 35 Ryan White Program clinics participating in MCC. Piecewise mixed-effects logistic regression with a random intercept estimated probabilities of VS from 12 months before MCC enrollment through 36 months after enrollment, accounting for time by covariate interactions for 3 comorbid conditions: housing instability, stimulant use, and depressive symptoms.

Results: The overall probability of VS increased from 0.35 to 0.77 within the first 6 months in the MCC Program, and this probability was maintained up to 36 months after enrollment. Those who reported housing instability, stimulant use, or multiple comorbid conditions did not achieve the same probability of VS by 36 months as those with none of those comorbidities.

Conclusions: Findings suggest that MCC improved the probability of VS for all patient groups regardless of the presence of comorbidities. However, those with comorbid conditions will still require increased support from patient-centered programs to address disparities in VS.

PubMed Link

Trajectories of Viral Suppression in People Living With HIV Receiving Coordinated Care: Differences by Comorbidities
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Categories

Behavioral Health, Comorbidities, HIV Clinical Outcomes, Key Populations, Recipient-Level, RWHAP Services, Systems Development