Impact of hepatitis coinfection on healthcare utilization among persons living with HIV

HRSA-Sponsored Article

Authors

Journal

Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes

Publication Year

2015

Abstract

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection are increasingly important sources of morbidity among HIV-infected persons. We determined associations between hepatitis coinfection and healthcare utilization among HIV-infected adults at 4 US sites during 2006-2011. Outpatient HIV visits did not differ by hepatitis serostatus and decreased over time. Mental health visits were more common among HIV/HCV coinfected persons than among HIV monoinfected persons [incidence rate ratio (IRR): 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08 to 1.50]. Hospitalization rates were higher among all hepatitis-infected groups than among HIV monoinfected (HIV/HBV: IRR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.44; HIV/HCV: IRR: 1.22, 95% CI: 1.10 to 1.36; HIV/HBV/HCV: IRR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.02 to 1.68). These findings may inform the design of clinical services and allocation of resources.

PubMed Link

Impact of hepatitis coinfection on healthcare utilization among persons living with HIV
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Categories

Comorbidities, RWHAP Services