Antiretroviral Prescription, Retention in Care and Viral Suppression by Place of Birth Among Adults With Diagnosed HIV in the United States-2015-2017, Medical Monitoring Project

Authors

Journal

AIDS Care

Publication Year

2020

Abstract

HIV clinical outcomes have not been fully assessed by place of birth at the national level. We analyzed the Medical Monitoring Project data, an annual cross-sectional survey designed to produce nationally representative estimates on adults with diagnosed HIV in the United States, collected during 2015-2017 (n = 7617). We compared sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical outcomes by place of birth using Rao-Scott chi-square tests (P < .05). Overall, 13.6% of adults with diagnosed HIV were non-US-born. During the past 12 months, a higher percentage of non-US-born than US-born adults, respectively, were prescribed ART (89.4% vs. 84.1%), retained in care (87.1% vs. 80.0%), virally suppressed at the last test (77.2% vs. 70.9%), and had sustained viral suppression (70.9% vs. 63.3%). A lower percentage of non-US-born adults reported binge drinking (13.0% vs. 16.1%), using non-injection drugs (15.3% vs. 31.7%), and suffering from depression (15.9% vs. 23.3%) or anxiety (10.0% vs. 20.2%). A significantly higher percentage of non-US-born adults had Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) coverage (54.4% vs. 43.1%) and attended a RWHAP-funded health care facility (73.9% vs. 66.6%). Factors contributing to better HIV clinical outcomes among non-US-born persons may include access to RWHAP coverage, lower levels of substance use, and better mental health.

PubMed Link

Antiretroviral Prescription, Retention in Care and Viral Suppression by Place of Birth Among Adults With Diagnosed HIV in the United States-2015-2017, Medical Monitoring Project
https://hab.hrsa.gov/hrsa-exit-disclaimer

Categories

HIV Clinical Outcomes, Key Populations